Ep. 25: Death Mountain Lifestyle (Playing Appalachia Part 6)

May 22, 2018

So what exactly is a mountain lifestyle? Is it a marketing phrase? A type of view from your window? A bonified set of cultural practices? Whatever it is, it must be pretty awesome, considering how awesomely expensive the mountain lifestyle is getting these days!

This week we're joined by Shaun Martin, a Nintendo loving editor working for an educational nonprofit in Greensboro, North Carolina. Originally from Marshall, NC, with family roots dug several generations down, Shaun has first-hand knowledge of the different styles of lives you can find in the Appalachian region of ye Old North State. We dig deep into the phrase "mountain lifestyle", uncovering the multiplicity of lives that make up mountain living including, you guessed it, lifestyles that include gaming!

(psst... confused about the episode title?)

This episode is part six of "Playing Appalachia", a series of conversations with Appalachian and Appalachian adjacent gamers and game makers. To start at the beginning, check out "What Games Are Getting Right About Appalachia" with Dr. Elizabeth Catte, followed by our conversation with Cardboard Computer about Kentucky Route Zero to learn more about the relationship between magical realism and Appalachia. The third part of the series is "Rural Flight, Virtually Speaking" with Meredith Wilson, an Appalachian transplant whose experiences in the region have affected the way she makes games (and who she makes games for), with part four introducing us to Appalachian-raised Jerel Culliss (aka King Lemming of Team CoFH) who regales us with tales of LAN parties and Minecraft modding ethics in "Modding Appalachia". In part five, "The Streamers of Madison County", we meet Renee Hill (aka The Caked Crusader), a video game live streamer and nerd extraordinaire whose home base is western North Carolina.

Stuff We Mentioned...
Marshall, NC
Greensboro, NC
Asheville, NC
A-B Emblem
Piedmont Region of NC
Madison’s history jailhouse
Urban Outfitters Protests
Legend of Zelda
SNES
Wii U
GameFAQs
Donkey Kong Country
Final Fantasy 7
Video Game Rental

Shaun Martin (The Cast)
Instagram: @spmartin42

JD (The Broad)
Website: GamingBroadly.com
Twitter: @JayDeeCepticon
Instagram: @JayDeeCepticon

Gaming Broad(cast) is the official podcast of GamingBroadly.com. Thank you to everyone who has liked, subscribed, and commented about Gaming Broad(cast) on Apple Podcasts! You can also follow this podcast on SpotifyPodbeanStitcherGoogle Music, and other places delightful podcasts can be found. You can also subscribe directly using our RSS feed. Want some gamey goodness in your email inbox? Sign up for some occasional(ly) playful newsletter updates. Thanks to Ben Cohn for the music for this episode!

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Ep. 24: Gaming Religion (Live Recording from SXSW 2018)

April 1, 2018

Hey Broadbeans! Today we’re interrupting our regularly scheduled programming to bring you a special live recording! On March 13th 2018, JD had the great honor of sitting alongside Dr. Gregory Grieve, Dr. Vit Sisler, and Helen Osman for a panel at SXSW titled “Gaming Religion: Finding Faith in Digital Games”.

As it turns out, religion and games have a lot to say to one another. Religious themes have supported the story lines of many mainstream games, from World of Warcraft to Halo and Civilizations. Gaming has also been described as a spiritual endeavor by avid gamers, and religious groups are increasingly creating and using games to counter religious stereotypes and teach members about core beliefs and practices. Stay tuned for a unique discussion about the ways that religion, ethics, and digital gaming intersect through the lenses of research, development, and education, and how video games can address issues of tolerance and cultivate civility in the digital age.

You may recognize Dr. Grieve from episode 5, “Imagining Play, Religion, and Education”, and we're over-the-moon to have the voices of Dr. Sisler and Helen Osman on this channel for the first time. 

Helen Osman is a communications expert who partners with leadership to raise visibility and create momentum for mission-focused and grassroots organizations, including clients such as Pope Francis and Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew.

Greg Grieve is a Professor and Head of the Religious Studies Department at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He researches and teaches at the intersection of digital culture, religion, and Asian traditions.

Vit Sisler is an Assistant Professor of New Media Studies at Charles University in Prague. His research focuses on serious video games, information and communication technologies in the Middle East, and Islam and digital media. He is also a lead designer of the award-winning video game on contemporary history, Attentat 1942, a 2018 IGF finalist in Excellence in Narrative.

To follow along with the audio, watch the intro video by Dr. Heidi Campbell on Youtube and download the presentation visuals from dropbox.

Stuff We Mentioned...
Sherlock Holmes and The Adventure of Silver Blaze (Book)
Playing with Religion in Digital Games (Book)
Second Life (Game?)
Cyber Zen (Book)
Buddhism, the Internet, and Digital Media (Book)
Methods for Studying Video Games and Religion (Book)
Attentat 1942 (Game)
NATO Commander (Game)
Kuma/War (Game)
Harem Adventura (Game)
Radwan Kasmiya, Author of Quraish (Person)
Special Force (Game)
Special Operation (Game)
Civilization (Game Series)
Overwatch (Game)
Pokemon Trading Card Game (Game)
The Great Alef Bet Race (Game)
Jewish Time Jump (Game)
Spent (Game)
Noam Pianko (Person)
URJ 6 Points Sci-Tech Academy (Organization)
Girls Who Code (Organization)

Helen Osman (Moderator)
LinkedIn: Helen Osman

Gregory Grieve, PhD (Panelist)
Website: gpgrieve.org
Book: Cyber Zen

Vit Sisler, PhD (Panelist)
Website: uisk.jinonice.cuni.cz/sisler/  
Video Game: Attentat 1942
Book: Methods for Studying Video Game and Religions

JD (Panelist)
Website: GamingBroadly.com
Twitter: @JayDeeCepticon
Instagram: @JayDeeCepticon

Gaming Broad(cast) is the official podcast of GamingBroadly.com. Thank you to everyone who has liked, subscribed, and commented about Gaming Broad(cast) on Apple Podcasts! You can also follow this podcast on SpotifyPodbeanStitcherGoogle Music, and other places delightful podcasts can be found. You can also subscribe directly using our RSS feed. Want some gamey goodness in your email inbox? Sign up for some occasional(ly) playful newsletter updates. Thanks to Ben Cohn for the music for this episode!

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Ep. 23: The Streamers of Madison County (Playing Appalachia Part 5)

March 11, 2018

Creeks aren't the only types of mountain streams in Appalachia. We also have video game live streams! This week we're joined by Renee Hill, a pastry chef, gamer, and video game live streamer known as "The Caked Crusader". Renee currently lives in Madison County, the same county in Western North Carolina where JD (the host) grew up. For some weird reason, a lot of the people Renee meet are in disbelief that an anime loving, tattooed, pink-haired cosplayer could also be an Appalachian native? Weird.   

Tune in this week to hear more about representation, mental health, crying during video games, growing up Appalachian and nerdy, and how video games helped Renee connect with others while growing up in the middle of nowhere. Also there are puns. Lots and lots of puns. 

This episode is part five of "Playing Appalachia", a series of conversations with Appalachian and Appalachian adjacent gamers and game makers. To start at the beginning, check out "What Games Are Getting Right About Appalachia" with Dr. Elizabeth Catte, followed by our conversation with Cardboard Computer about Kentucky Route Zero to learn more about the relationship between magical realism and Appalachia. The third part of the series is "Rural Flight, Virtually Speaking" with Meredith Wilson, an Appalachian transplant whose experiences in the region have affected the way she makes games (and who she makes games for), with part four introducing us to Appalachian-raised Jerel Culliss (aka King Lemming of Team CoFH) who regales us with tales of LAN parties and Minecraft modding ethics in "Modding Appalachia".

Stuff We Mentioned...
Moonshine 
Popcorn Sutton 
Anime 
Sailor Moon
Sharkle and Mae from Night in the Woods 
Stick and Poke 
Dragon Ball Z 
Teen Titans 
Star Wars 
Atari 
Pitfall Atari 2600 
Sega Genesis 
Vectorman 
Princess Leia 
Undertale 
Doki Doki Literature Club 
Actual Sunlight
Scooter from Borderlands 2
Bobby from Supernatural

JD (The Broad)
Website: GamingBroadly.com
Twitter: @JayDeeCepticon
Instagram: @JayDeeCepticon

Renee Hill (The Cast)
Twitch: TheCakedCrusader
YouTube: TheCakedCrusader
Instagram:@TheCakedCrusader
Twitter: @cakedcrusader13

Gaming Broad(cast) is the official podcast of GamingBroadly.com. Thank you to everyone who has liked, subscribed, and commented about Gaming Broad(cast) on Apple Podcasts! You can also follow this podcast on SpotifyPodbeanStitcherGoogle Music, or subscribe directly using our RSS feed. Want some gamey goodness in your email inventory? Sign up for some occasional(ly) playful newsletter updates. Thanks to Ben Cohn for the music for this episode!

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Ep. 22: Modding Appalachia (Playing Appalachia Part 4)

February 23, 2018

What do Minecraft and Appalachia have in common? They both have people trying to modify them. So could Minecraft mods teach us something about how to go about ethically modding Appalachia?

This week we're joined by Jerel Culliss (aka King Lemming), an Appalachian-raised engineer who moonlights as a reknown Minecraft modder. Jerel is founder of Team CoFH, the group responsible for Thermal Expansion, a mod that adds technology, like machines, to the world of Minecraft. Coincidentally, there's also been some recent media hype about bringing big names in tech to the Appalachian region (like Amazon HQ, for instance). Not to mention the fact that "silicon hollar" is really coming into its own as a google-worthy buzzword.

But adding technology, whether that technology is pixelated or Appalachian, isn't as simple and straight forward as you might think. Tune in to learn more about the lovely LAN history behind Team CoFH, the ethics of hacking and modding video games, and ways to imagine a tech-savvy Appalachia that doesn't leave the dedicated fan-base that lives there out in the cold with the mobs.

Jerel Culliss is an engineer and hacker originally from Southwest Virginia. He has a PhD in electrical engineering and currently lives in Knoxville, TN. He is most well known online as "King Lemming," head of Team CoFH and the co-creator of Thermal Expansion, a popular mod for Minecraft.

This episode is part four of "Playing Appalachia", a series of conversations with Appalachian and Appalachian adjacent gamers and game makers. To start at the beginning, check out "What Games Are Getting Right About Appalachia" with Dr. Elizabeth Catte, followed by our conversation with Cardboard Computer about Kentucky Route Zero, their game set in rural Kentucky, to learn more about the relationship between magical realism and Appalachia. The third part of the series is "Rural Flight, Virtually Speaking" with Meredith Wilson, an Appalachian transplant whose experiences in the region have affected the way she makes games (and who she makes games for). 

Stuff We Mentioned...
Minecraft
Caipirinha
LAN Party
Diablo
Everquest (aka "the Dark Souls of MMOs")
Half-Life
Video Game Mod
Destiny 2
Uncanny Valley
StarCraft
Counter-Strike
Esports
They Are Billions
Hacking
Cyber Security Consultant
Fate of the World
MINECON
Cynycal
Mine Little Pony: Friendship is Crafting Mod

JD (The Broad)
Website: GamingBroadly.com
Twitter: @JayDeeCepticon
Instagram: @JayDeeCepticon

Jerel Culliss aka King Lemming (The Cast)
Website: TeamCoFH.com
Twitter: @KingLemmingCoFH 

Gaming Broad(cast) is the official podcast of GamingBroadly.com. Thank you to everyone who has liked, subscribed, and commented about Gaming Broad(cast) on Apple Podcasts! You can also follow this podcast on SpotifyPodbeanStitcherGoogle Music, or subscribe directly using our RSS feed. Want some gamey goodness in your email inventory? Sign up for some occasional(ly) playful newsletter updates. Thanks to Ben Cohn for the music for this episode!

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Ep. 21: Rural Flight, Virtually Speaking (Playing Appalachia Part 3)

February 9, 2018

Meredith Wilson is participating in rural flight, virtually speaking. As young people from Appalachia increasingly move out of the region, Meredith Wilson has done something strange: moved to rural Virginia to make virtual reality video games. 

Meredith Wilson is a public health epidemiologist turned video game developer who was a participant in Oculus Launchpad 2017. Wilson used to do public health research at Virginia Tech's Biocomplexity Institute, designing mobile games about diseases that were literally going viral, and appears to have been permanently infected with the game development bug. She's the founder and lead game designer for Bedhouse Games, a small independent video game studio based out of rural Virginia that is currently developing a GearVR science fiction flight simulation-esque video game.

While not originally from the Appalachian region, Wilson's work, as well as the way she works, has been impacted by her experience living there. From the types of characters she designs, to how she thinks about the relationship between ethics and education, and even her opinion on eating rabbit, Appalachia has clearly had an impact on this tenderfoot transplant.

This episode is part three of "Playing Appalachia", a series of conversations with Appalachian and Appalachian adjacent gamers and game makers. To start at the beginning, check out Ep. 18: What Games Are Getting Right About Appalachia with Dr. Elizabeth Catte. You can also take a listen to our conversation with Cardboard Computer about Kentucky Route Zero, their game set in rural Kentucky, to learn more about the relationship between magical realism and Appalachia.

Stuff We Mentioned...
VR.5
Games for Change Summit
Kiya 
Epidemiology 
Virus Tracker 
Microsoft Flight Simulator 
Descent 
Star Wars: TIE Fighter 
Alien (film)
Battle of Blair Mountain
"Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, VA 
The "Harvey Weinsteins of Science
@darbianSRL (a Super Mario speedrunner)

JD (The Broad)
Website: GamingBroadly.com
Twitter: @JayDeeCepticon
Instagram: @JayDeeCepticon

Meredith Wilson (The Cast)
Website: BedhouseGames.com
Twitter: @papermantis

Gaming Broad(cast) is the official podcast of GamingBroadly.com. Thank you to everyone who has liked, subscribed, and commented about Gaming Broad(cast) on Apple Podcasts! You can also follow this podcast on SpotifyPodbeanStitcherGoogle Music, or subscribe directly using our RSS feed. Want some gamey goodness in your email inbox? Sign up for some occasional(ly) playful newsletter updates. Thanks to Ben Cohn for the music for this episode!

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Ep. 20: #ReclaimTheBasement (Live Recording from PAX South 2018)

January 24, 2018

In the golden age of massively multiplayer online games like Overwatch and Destiny, why are some players choosing to go it alone? Is it a radical act of self-care, anti-social tendencies, an effect of online harassment, or something else? Take a break from Gaming Broad(cast)'s regularly scheduled programming and tune in to this special LIVE recording of a Gaming Broad(cast) moderated panel, "Reclaiming Basements in a Multiplayer Era: Why We Game Alone". Join Andrea Ayres (Lemonsucker Games) and Ian Danskin (Innuendo Studios), as well as the main broad herself, JD Mallindine, at PAX South 2018 to explore the social and psychological reasons players are reclaiming their alone time. Don't forget to check out #ReclaimTheBasement on Twitter to see what the community had to say about gaming alone! 

Download Presentation Visuals

Research...
Playing alone v playing with others: Differences in player experiences and indicators of wellbeing (Vella, et. al 2015)
At Least Nine Ways to Play: Gamer Mentalities (Kallio, et. al 2011)
Online-only friends, real-life friends or strangers? Differential associations with passion and social capital in video game play (Perry, et. al 2018)
Social Context of Video Game Play (Vella, et. al 2016) 
Teenage Girls Are Playing Video Games. You Just Might Not Hear Them from Kotaku (Suellentrop, 2015)
Teens, Technology and Friendship by the Pew Research Center (Lenhart, et. al 2015)
The Emergence of Solitude as a Constructive Domain of Solitude in Early Adolescence (Larson, 1997)
The "social" facilitation of eating without the presence of others: Self-reflection on eating makes food taste better and people eat more (Nakata, et. al 2017)
When Novels Were Bad For You in Smithsonian Magazine (North, 2014)
Public Displays of Play: Studying Online Games in Physical Settings (Taylor, et. a. 2014)
Children of the 80s, Never Fear Video Games Did Not Ruin Your Life from Smithsonian Magazine (Newman, 2017)
The Fierce Triumph of Loneliness from Catapult (Fitzgerald, 2016)
How to be Alone by Sara Maitland
Solitude by Philip Koch
Republic of Noise: The Loss of Solitude in Schools and Culture by Diana Senechal
Loneliness and Solitude in Education by Julian Stern
Alone Together by Sherry Turkle
A Room of One's Own by Virginia Woolf 

JD (The Broad & Moderator)
Website: GamingBroadly.com
Twitter: @JayDeeCepticon
Instagram: @JayDeeCepticon

Andrea Ayres (The Cast & Panelist)
Twitter: @missafayres
Instagram: @afad435
Website: Ayresdeets.com
Lemonsucker Games: lemonsuckergames.com

Ian Danskin (The Cast & Panelist)
Twitter: @InnuendoStudios
Youtube Channel: Innuendo Studios
Patreon: Innuendo Studios
Tumblr: InnuendoStudios

 

Gaming Broad(cast) is the official podcast of GamingBroadly.com. Thank you to everyone who has liked, subscribed, and commented about Gaming Broad(cast) on Apple Podcasts! You can also follow this podcast on SpotifyPodbeanStitcherGoogle Music, or subscribe directly using our RSS feed. Want some gamey goodness in your email inbox? Sign up for some occasional(ly) playful newsletter updates. Thanks to Ben Cohn for the music for this episode!

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Ep. 19: Kentucky Route Zero and the Route to Appalachia (Playing Appalachia Part 2)

January 11, 2018

It's near impossible to talk about Appalachia and video games, and games that "get Appalachia right", without talking about Kentucky Route Zero. The game itself is mysterious, filled with empty space and people with featureless faces, a five-part digital theater that leaves enough room for Appalachia to rush in. What is it about this surreal point and click adventure game that feels so real?

In part two of Gaming Broadcast's "Playing Appalachia" series, we're joined by Cardboard Computer, the makers of Kentucky Route Zero, to learn what the magical has to say about the real (especially as it relates to Appalachia) and the surprising ways Appalachians responded to seeing their home reanimated in digital form.

Cardboard Computer = games by Jake Elliot, Tamas Kemenczy, and Ben Babbitt. They're currently working on Kentucky Route Zero, a magical realist adventure game about a secret highway in the caves beneath Kentucky, and the mysterious folks who travel it. Acts I-IV of Kentucky Route Zero are available now, with Act V available sometime other than now.

For part one of Gaming Broadcast’s series Playing Appalachia, a collection of conversations with Appalachian and Appalachian adjacent gamers and game makers, check out Ep. 18 What Games Are Getting Right About Appalachia with Dr. Elizabeth Catte.

Stuff We Mentioned...
Kentucky Route Zero
Mammoth Cave
Colossal Cave Adventure
Mark Fisher
History of Kentucky Unions
Spirograph
Magical Realism
Gabriel García Márquez and The Autumn of the Patriarch
Isabella Allende and The House of the Spirits
Southern Gothic
Flannery O'Connor
Tennessee Williams and The Glass Menagerie
"It's a lie, but not everything in it is false."

JD (The Broad)
Website: GamingBroadly.com
Twitter: @JayDeeCepticon
Instagram: @JayDeeCepticon

Cardboard Computer (The Cast)
Website: CardboardComputer.com
Twitter: @cardboardcompy
Instagram: @cardboardcompy
Kentucky Route Zero: KentuckyRouteZero.com 

Gaming Broad(cast) is the official podcast of GamingBroadly.com. Thank you to everyone who has liked, subscribed, and commented about Gaming Broad(cast) on Apple Podcasts! You can also follow this podcast on SpotifyPodbeanStitcherGoogle Music, or subscribe directly using our RSS feed. Want some gamey goodness in your email inbox? Sign up for some occasional(ly) playful newsletter updates. Thanks to Ben Cohn for the music for this episode!

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Ep. 18: What Games Are Getting Right About Appalachia (Playing Appalachia Part 1)

December 14, 2017

In 2016, the United States collectively pointed a trembling finger of accusation at the Appalachian region. The verdict was in: America was screwed, and “Trump Country” was to blame. Journalists began to flock to the region, looking to demystify and correctly identify the dysfunctional roots of Appalachia and its people. Think piece after think piece was published, many (if not most) reducing the complex and nuanced history of the region into a singular narrative about a backwards and impoverished white working class that were desperate and foolish enough to vote against their best interest. But being exposed to only this narrative does more than just oversimplify, it also obfuscates and distracts from more sinister stories of power and greed.

Elizabeth Catte, author of What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia, joins us to start a new and more nuanced conversation about Appalachia. In this episode, Dr. Catte frankly assesses the history of Appalachian stereotypes and the reasons why these stereotypes became and remain so popular. By providing us with examples of writing, art, and video games that “get it right” about Appalachia, Elizabeth reveals why it matters so much that we complicate the current Appalachian narrative not just for Appalachia’s sake, but for the sake of the United States as a whole.

Elizabeth Catte is a historian and writer originally from East Tennessee. She has a PhD in history and currently lives in Staunton, Virginia (pronounced Stanton) and is the director of Passel, a historical consulting firm. Her book, What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia will be out from Belt Publishing February 2018.

This episode is the first in Gaming Broadcast’s new series Playing Appalachia, a collection of conversations with Appalachian and Appalachian adjacent gamers and game makers.

Stuff We Mentioned...
Appalachian Regional Commission
Belt Magazine
Ohio Valley ReSource Journalism Collaborative
Whitesburg Kentucky Appalshop WMMT
The Trillbilly Worker’s Party Podcast
West Virginia Public Broadcasting Inside Appalachia "The Struggle to Stay"
WUOT Knoxville
Daily Yonder
The Bitter Southerner
Southerly
Scalawag Magazine
Sarah Smarsh
Queer Appalachia and “Electric Dirt”
Photographers like Roger MayRaymond Thompson, and Megan King
100 Days of Appalachia
WMMT’s “Calls from Home”
Jesse Donaldson’s "On Homesickness: A Plea (In Place)"
Night in the Woods
Kentucky Route Zero

JD (The Broad)
Website: GamingBroadly.com
Twitter: @JayDeeCepticon
Instagram: @JayDeeCepticon

Elizabeth Catte, PhD (The Cast)
Website: ElizabethCatte.com
Twitter: @elizabethcatte
Book: What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia
Historical Consulting Firm: Passel

Gaming Broad(cast) is the official podcast of GamingBroadly.com. Thank you to everyone who has liked, subscribed, and commented about Gaming Broad(cast) on Apple Podcasts! You can also follow this podcast on SpotifyPodbeanStitcherGoogle Music, or subscribe directly using our RSS feed. Want some gamey goodness in your email inbox? Sign up for some occasional(ly) playful newsletter updates. Thanks to Ben Cohn for the music for this episode!

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Ep. 17: Triple A Blues (Developer Doldrums Part 3)

November 18, 2017

What does it mean to work in AAA game development? In the gaming community, the term "AAA" (pronounced “triple A”) comes with a lot of baggage. While at face value AAA is just an informal way to classify games and games studios that have the highest development and marketing budgets, the category also comes with negative conotations. You’d think more money meant less problems for game developers, right? Wrong! AAA studios are often seen as giant, painfully selfish corporations that care about one thing and one thing alone: money. From "lazy" to "immoral" and "untalented", game developers at AAA studios are often accused of having a myriad of moral failings, regardless of how much control they have over the final product. 

Rachel Hammond, a ten-year veteran of the gaming industry, explains the big ol’ sad bits that are part of these big ol' games projects. From dealing with bad decisions made by top executives and being unable to respond directly to fans because of corporate gag orders, to emotionally coping with the vitriolic comments and death threats directed towards AAA studios (and the people that work there), Rachel has seen it all!

But it’s not all bad. Rachel’s love for programming video games (which started when she was 5 years old), hasn’t been squished by the pressures of the AAA space. Rachel, even after all this time, still loves her work in the games industry, even if the games industry doesn’t always love her back! Seriously. It's amazing. She genuinely loves making games that other people will love. Tune in to Episode 17 to learn about the issues that face AAA developers, and what we can do to help make the gaming community just a TEENSY WEENSY bit more empathetic.

Rachel Hammond has been making video games of all sizes for more than 10 years, and she still remembers the game review "Congratulations, you made a 6 year-old cry". She currently works in the AAA game space at a company that will inevitably be a poorly kept secret as the podcast goes on.

This episode is part three of the “Developer Doldrums” series, a collection of conversations with game developers about the not-so-happy bits that pop up when making play objects. For part one, check out Episode 15: Grief, Game Development, and the Emotional Significance of Oatmeal with Andrea Ayres of Lemonsucker Games to learn how the loss of a parent and an eating disorder (plus therapy) can lead to making a video game. Or, for something with a little less death, check out part two, "Episode 16: Long Distance Bromance" to hear from indie game studio Hydezeke on the pleasures and pains of being in a long distance game dev relationship. Oh, did I mention there's also a mini game in that episode? It's games, all the way down!

Stuff we mentioned...
AAA (video game industry)
Bratz
SpongeBob SquarePants
Transmedia storytelling
Ratatouille (video game)
Rats are very smart and gr8 at games
Sesame Street: Cookie’s Counting Carnival
Video Game Crash of 1983
The funniest joke in the world
Warren Spector and the Denius-Sams Gaming Academy
John Romero
Reddit thread: Game programmers: What game mechanic are you proud to have implemented?
Dunning-Kruger effect
SXSW Gaming 2018 Panel: IH8URGAME: Fostering Empathy in Gaming Communities

JD (The Broad)
Website: GamingBroadly.com
Twitter: @JayDeeCepticon
Instagram: @JayDeeCepticon

Rachel Hammond (The Cast)
Twitter: @xespera

Gaming Broad(cast) is the official podcast of GamingBroadly.com. Thank you to everyone who has liked, subscribed, and commented about Gaming Broad(cast) on Apple Podcasts! You can also follow this podcast on SpotifyPodbeanStitcherGoogle Music, or subscribe directly using our RSS feed. Want some gamey goodness in your email inbox? Sign up for some occasional(ly) playful newsletter updates. Thanks to Los Kurados for the use of their song "Rojo Y Azul" for the intro and outro music of our podcast.

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Ep. 16: Long Distance Bromance (Developer Doldrums Part 2)

November 4, 2017

Long distance relationships are enough to make anyone sad. Throw in making a game together? Even sadder! How do long distance game developers stay in the game? As hard as it is to build something together when you’re not, you know, actually together, Michael and Ben of Hydezeke are proof that with the right person (and for the right project), even distance can’t hold you back. Equal parts funny as it is emotionally honest, this episode gives hope to the idea that you can find a project partner to help you stay afloat in the sometimes turbulent waters of  “creative collaboration”.   

Michael Savage-Benoist [Benwa] is a game designer and dog enthusiast from Fairfax, Virginia. Ben Cohn is a music composer and banjo enthusiast from Orlando, Florida. What started out as a middle-school friendship has, 8 years later, became Hydezeke [Hide-zeek], an indie game studio. 

Hydezeke is beset by the troubles of long-distance collaboration and conflicting life events, but Ben and Michael maintain their bond through their love for game design and bashing Sonic games. Flamberge, their flagship game still in development, was successfully Kickstarted (and accepted to Steam Greenlight, when that was still a thing) about three years ago. The extended development period is a bummer not only for the fans and supporters of Flamberge, but for Michael and Ben too. As tough as some of the comments are, Michael and Ben refuse to give up on their vision for the game’s future, and remain determined to deliver a good, quality game to the fans who have stuck with them all this time.

This episode is part two of the “Developer Doldrums” series, a collection of conversations with game developers about the not-so-happy bits that happen during the creation of these digital play objects. For part one, check out Episode 15: Grief, Game Development, and the Emotional Significance of Oatmeal with Andrea Ayres of Lemonsucker Games.

Stuff we mentioned...
Artemis Fowl
LACMA
Alphonse Mucha Princess Hyacinth
Magfest 2017 Awards
Flamberge Kickstarter
Flamberge on STEAM
Bumble Rumble by Ben Cohn (The Dating Game Music)


JD (The Broad)
Website: GamingBroadly.com
Twitter: @JayDeeCepticon
Instagram: @JayDeeCepticon

Hydezeke (The Cast)
Website: Hydezeke.com
Michael’s Twitter: @hydezeke
Ben’s Twitter: @bionicbenbo
Ben’s Soundcloud: bionicbenbo

Gaming Broad(cast) is the official podcast of GamingBroadly.com. Thank you to everyone who has liked, subscribed, and commented about Gaming Broad(cast) on Apple Podcasts! You can also follow this podcast on SpotifyPodbeanStitcherGoogle Music, or subscribe directly using our RSS feed. Want some gamey goodness in your email inbox? Sign up for some occasional(ly) playful newsletter updates. Thanks to Los Kurados for the use of their song "Rojo Y Azul" for the intro and outro music of our podcast.

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